Who We Are

arrow PNG
  • Welcome to St. Thomas Episcopal Church!

    Our vision is of a community where lay people and clergy share in the ministry of Jesus Christ through worship and service.
  • Where We Are

    arrow PNG
  • Welcome to St. Thomas Episcopal Church!

    Our vision is of a community where lay people and clergy share in the ministry of Jesus Christ through worship and service.
  • What We Do

    arrow PNG
  • Welcome to St. Thomas Episcopal Church!

    Our vision is of a community where lay people and clergy share in the ministry of Jesus Christ through worship and service.
  • Our Mission

    arrow PNG
  • Welcome to St. Thomas Episcopal Church!

    Our vision is of a community where lay people and clergy share in the ministry of Jesus Christ through worship and service.
  • Welcome

    Our vision is of a community where lay people and clergy share in the ministry of Jesus Christ through worship and service.
    teaser image

    Coming up!

    Hometown Mission… July 19-21, 2013 – Youth will be helping ready the Columbia House (A home for young adults who will live in community and take the church out into Savannah).

    Wednesday Night Specials… Every Wednesday evening through the school year, the EYC will be gathering for prayer and social activities in the EYC room from 6:45pm-8:45pm.  The evenings will end with prayer services lead by the Youth in the chapel.  Friends are always welcome—the more the merrier!

    ____________________________

    First Communion 

    Four of St. Thomas’ Youth received their First Communion  on May 12, 2013 following study of the Holy Eucharist.

    Youth Feeding Savannah’s Hungry

    With our friends from St. Peter’s Skidaway and HUGS, the St. Thomas Youth provided sack lunches for the local needy.  For more information about HUGS: http://www.headsupsavannah.org/

     

    Youth Sunday Service

    Last Fall, the St. Thomas Youth took part in leading the 10am worship service.  The guest speaker was Grace Carpenter whose homily follows.  St. Thomas’ young people also presented Fr. Richard  Nelson with a beautiful hand made stole for his 29th priestly ordination anniversary.

    Fr. Richard With Bells by Geri Nelson

    Homily by Grace Carpenter

    A week ago, around Halloween, I was asked by a fellow student what I was planning on doing for the night. I explained to her how every year, I ask a group of my friends to dress up in a theme. This year we decided on Peter Pan. We handed out candy in our costumes and pretended to be our character for the entire night. This included me talking in a British accent nonstop for about 3 hours. This classmate gave me a disgusted look and snickered. When I asked her what was so funny, she replied, “That’s fun, if you like embarrassing yourself!” In return, I replied shyly, “Well, what are you doing this Wednesday?” She said that she planned on getting “completely wasted” at a costume party. Well, I bet you all can understand what I was thinking at the time: “Good luck embarrassing YOURSELF!” Most teens have felt this same sort of pressure, but the majority would have conformed and gone to the party. Everybody needs friends, but when you are young, friends can have more influence over how you dress, act, and think than your parents do. “You are who you hang out with” is a popular saying. If friends play such an important role in shaping the lives of youths, the question that remains is: Who, then, should be your friend? And to what extent should your life be influenced by their opinion? Once the influence of counterfeit friends has caused us to form certain habits, it becomes difficult to give up or break those habits. Sometimes, the tendency is to continue to struggle and pray for forgiveness. It would do better to pray beforehand asking God for strength when you feel the urge to do evil. If you keep friends with those who love God, you can avoid some of the ugly things in life. I have discovered several like-minded friends who have helped me through the pressures of teenage years. Because of this, I understand that everything we do should be for God and to His glory. He died for US. He gave us a life where our decisions are forgiven. We have an obligation to Him to lead a life of love and service to others AS WELL as ourselves. There is more to friendship than having a shoulder to cry on. Friends must correct others even when it hurts. A real friend would warn you when you head down a wrong path, even if they know you may not like what they say.  Should you allow a bruised ego to cause you to reject someone who has cared enough about you to tell you the truth? Proverbs 27:6 says,” There is more trust to be put in bruises from one who loves than in abundant kisses from one who hates.”

     

    Today’s Gospel discusses the pressure put on Jesus by the Pharisees. Everywhere He went, He was scrutinized and judged. Everyone was waiting for him to mess up and for excuses to condemn him. Most teenagers feel peer pressure in some form during middle and high school years. Some handle it better than others. We, as teenagers, are at the vulnerable age where our peer’s thoughts really matter. Everyone wants to fit in and be “normal”. Jesus had tremendous courage to hold firm in his teachings, even when important, influential people discouraged and tried to trick him. Some teenagers do not have that courage to stand up to “cool people” who tell them that drugs, drinking and sex is fun. But one must find the wisdom to either say no or stop. I found this through God and my savior Jesus Christ. He is my rock and stronghold when I am tempted to join in the wrongdoings. Praying to Him calms me and gives me a sense of shelter from the evils of the world. With His guidance, I am wise and realistic about my choices. What may seem cool to most teens, is in fact, one of the worst decisions they will make. Growing up in a healthy, Christian environment with strong moral values provides the support needed to say no.  A religious education from church and home supplies young people with a faithful foundation that will ALWAYS give them hope and courage during hard times. For example, in the gospel today, a poor widow gave all she had to God. Her two pennies meant more to her than the gold of the wealthy. I think it is true to say that none of us here are in as dire a state as she was, yet we musn’t ever take what we have for granted. Thanking God everyday keeps us positive and upbeat, such as this woman. Money is not the only thing we can give to help others. We can give our love and friendship. In most cases, this means more than all of the possessions of the world.

     

    So… These lessons are learned in youth, and learned and learned again. It is why I am here today.  A firm Christian foundation is important and aids the decisions of life.

     

    Post to Twitter Tweet This Post

    

    Follow Us

    Email UsFacebook

    © Copyright 2011. St. Thomas Episcopal Church. All Rights Reserved.